Top 10 Windows PowerShell Commands That You Must Know

Top 10 Windows PowerShell Commands That You Must Know

February 5, 2020 You will see that all the latest Microsoft server products require PowerShell in order to function properly. Many management tasks require the command line to be completed. There are ten Windows PowerShell commands you must know and use if you are a Windows administrator.
These PowerShell commands are essential for anyone who doesn’t know them. PowerShell is more than just speed in executing commands. It also offers high-level flexibility and control through the scripting language. This makes PowerShell an integral part of Windows administration. This blog article will focus on the most important commands you need to be proficient in order to increase your value at work.
1. Get-Help
Administrators should know this cmdlet. It can be used to help with almost all commands. To find out how the Get-Process command works, type the following: gethelp -name getprocess. The parameter Name is always optional. This will display the entire command syntax on the screen. It can also be used with specific verbs or nouns. You can search for other commands that you can use in conjunction with the Get verb by typing: get-help get*
2. ConvertTo-HTML
Administrators can access large amounts of data about a system with PowerShell. In some cases, however, you might need to go beyond the screen’s view. You might need to create a report to send to your team. You will need to use ConvertTo-HTML’s command line. You can use the command by passing the output of the other one to ConvertTo-HTML. To manage the HTML file’s output properties, you will need the -Property switch. You will also need to create an filename.
3. Set-ExecutionPolicy
It is possible to create and execute PowerShell scripts within a PowerShell environment. However, Microsoft has already disabled scripting by default to prevent malicious code from being executed in the environment. You can use the Set-ExecutionPolicy commandline to manage security around PowerShell scripts. There are four levels of security that you can access:
Restricted: This is the default policy that blocks PowerShell’s interactive command input. This will make it impossible for PowerShell scripts not to run.
Unrestricted : This removes all restrictions from the implementation policy.
RemoteSigned : If the RemoteSigned implementation policy has been set, local PowerShell scripts that have been locally created will be able run. However, scripts that have been remotely created will not be able to run.