Break the Email Habit – Encouragement of Collaboration Tools

Break the Email Habit – Encouragement of Collaboration Tools

Encourage Adoption – Pay attention to the “People Part”.
Here are some tips to get your users to stop using email and start working online to share files, manage tasks and communicate better. It all starts with a simple and intuitive technology platform. However, it is important to encourage adoption and use.
Understanding Incentives
There are two ways to encourage users to collaborate online. One, users will log in to access or share information because they believe it is valuable to them personally. Two, they will log into the site and use it when they are expected by someone in authority.
The tool must offer valuable services to its users in order to encourage “voluntary” usage. If the content and functionality help busy users to access information or accomplish a task, they will log in and use it voluntarily. Recognizing users who make valuable contributions can increase their motivation to actively participate.
Other cases where peer recognition and volunteerism are not sufficient, organizations need to set clear expectations for their members and reinforce them frequently. Incentives are simply the desire to do what is asked. This is a common recommendation that may sound obvious, but it can be lost in the rush for other, more prominent activities. It is possible to include responsibilities that require a significant amount of time into job descriptions.
Types of users
Experience has shown that participation online can vary greatly between user groups. Therefore, it is important to plan for these different types. These are listed below.
Super Users – Super users are active community members who not only contribute content, but also take responsibility for it and promote it. They will, for example, help to police content for appropriateness, and guide users informally about expectations and norms. They will welcome new users and help them to understand the community and its role within their work. Although there will be a few Super Users, they are vital to the success of the initiative.
Regulars – These are the most “good” users. They log in regularly and contribute content of various types with some frequency. Although they are not as active as Super Users but there are more of them, and so in aggregate they make up an important part of the community.
Contributors – While many users visit the site regularly, they will only contribute once in a while. Although they don’t give much to the community they still show an interest in it. Some may become regulars with additional support and incentives.
Browsers – A large segment of the population visits the site occasionally, but they rarely or never contribute to it. These users are potential Contributors, but they need to be promoted, given additional incentives, and perhaps more training.
No-shows – There will always be potential users who don’t get on board with the community. These users should be converted periodically, but not if you are putting too much effort. However, it would be worthwhile to discuss the reasons these users aren’t active and identify any dissatisfiers, or disincentives, within the community.
An announcement should be sent to all potential users when an organization is ready for a collaboration tool to be launched. The announcement should be concise but clearly communicate the following:
The organization’s goals
The “selling points” are the value it will bring and the incentives that it will offer.
A summary of the services it will include – both content as well as functionality
Here are some guidelines and expectations to help you get started