7 Reasons Multitasking Doesn’t Work

7 Reasons Multitasking Doesn’t Work

This guest article is by Kristy Gayton, STARTplanner.
Many have praised multitasking as the secret to achieving record-breaking success. Multitasking has been proven false over the years.
Multitasking has been disproven in studies. These studies encourage people to turn multitasking inside-out to determine if it is an ally or enemy. Multitasking can have a negative impact on an individual but it can also cause harm to a business entity.
Are you still convinced you can do a great project if you respond to emails while simultaneously working on a conference call and helping a colleague at the next desk? Continue reading to learn about 7 possible drawbacks to multitasking.

1. Loss of focus
2. Memory loss
3. Productivity decline
4. Disorganization
5. Inconsistent results
6. Stress levels are higher
7. Costs have risen
Next steps

1. Loss of focus
Employers and employees who are constantly switching between tasks and projects often have difficulty focusing.
Multitasking can lead to a split in their attention and time, which makes it difficult to get the most out of each task. Multitasking can lead to repetitive tasks and even administrative tasks, which can make it difficult to stay focused and complete your projects on time.
You can choose to divide your time into smaller chunks and focus on specific tasks, whether you’re calling a client or looking at your email messages.
2. Memory loss
Multitasking can be a time when your brain is at its most active. This can lead to cognitive function over-stimulation, which can lead memory loss. Think about the effects of multitasking on your long-term memory if you are a chronic multitasker.
Other factors that can increase the rate of memory loss, such as age, environment and current health conditions, can also contribute to it.
If you’re focused on a project but get distracted by unrelated calls or social media notifications, it can be difficult, if not impossible to keep the information you were working on.
The brain can’t distinguish between the vital elements of your project and random cat photos if there are too many stimuli at once.
3. Productivity decline
Competing in business is largely about who performs better. Performance is also a key factor in project success. As a project manager, it’s important to eliminate inefficiencies and “bugs” from your work processes so that you get the best out of your team members and your time.
A lackluster workforce is not the best thing for smooth operations. Multitasking is a common problem among employees who aren’t performing at their best. They might believe that multitasking will increase their productivity.
It’s time to get it right! Switching between tasks can hinder progress. Of course, it’s not possible to multitask. We just do a lot of smaller tasks in quick succession. Switching can have a cognitive impact.
4. Disorganization
While team members are completing new tasks, existing tasks will remain on their To Do List. Their week’s workloads become cluttered. The backlog of tasks to be completed is further exacerbated by the addition of new tasks.
A paper-free office is not a reality for most people. Tasks can bring sticky notes, pieces and paper, as well as printouts.
This situation can lead to a messy workstation that ultimately leads to productivity loss.
5. Inconsistent results
Multitasking is possible